3 Mar 2017, 8:02pm
debt personal finance
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  • Papers please – the early retiree as identity cleanskin

    Mortgage – check. PAYE – check. Credit card loans – check. In my wage slave days I threw off enough data crumbs to feed the data harvesting operation that has grown into the identity check industry. There’s a creeping centralisation and authoritarian streak to finance these days, due to the odious Know Your Customer (KYC) regulatory burden. In a curious reversal of the burden of proof, banks can freeze/shut down your accounts, and the ancients rights of the Magna Carta do not apply and you do not get due process – the bank will refuse to confirm of deny anything about the account. This is why you should never have all your liquid cash in one bank account, I have three although I use one mostly, but the others have savings and current accounts ready to roll should I lose access to that. I have never had an account frozen, but the authoritarianism goes deeply against the principles of habeas corpus I was taught at school, that in theory an Englishman has the right to hear in court the trumped up charges held against him. It just doesn’t apply.

    However, for some reason I increasingly have pain with the KYC regulations. I got into a massive fight with Betfair betting exchange in my abortive foray into matched betting when they took my money but decided they didn’t want to release the deposit, never mind the winnings because they couldn’t confirm I existed. Clearly I was not their typical gambling customer. I believe this general grief is the penalty of not being a wage slave, not using a mobile phone on a regular basis, and it being several years since I owed anyone any money. I can’t be found in mortgage records, and while I have three credit cards I haven’t changed these for nearly ten years, and my bank accounts are all old. I am a fail on MSE’s Credit club which makes me think that a thin file with Experian is my problem –

    There are a few reasons which may stop Experian from being able to verify your identity; for example, you may have a ‘thin file’. This just means there may be too little information held about you to be able to verify your identity.

    […]

    Older accounts can also cause verification issues…

    – Was your account opened before 1998? If so, your bank may not be sharing the account details with Experian as it was opened before the Data Protection Act came into force. To remedy this, you can contact your bank and ask that it applies a marker to ensure your account details are shared with the credit reference agencies.

    I encountered this most recently when I tried to register online for NS&I, not particularly because I wanted to check on my roughly 15k worth of ILSCs but because I was going to register a lasting power of attorney to add to my mother’s motley collection of Premium Bonds 1. The online system barfed and I have to use the post. Same with registering for online self assessment a couple of years ago. I had grief with Barclays when I wanted to register the LPA though I have to say that they actually brought human beings and a decent helping of common sense to the operation and sorted it out.

    I still have an old paper driving licence with no photocard so some organisations get shirty about taking that, and I am down to one last utility bill as a paper bill, kept that way purely to have something to support proof of address.

    Papers please? On yer bike, officer…

    Think the UK doesn’t have ID cards? You’re wrong. Like the Jesuits, we like to get to them when they are young

    One of the joys of being a Brit is that for cultural reasons we don’t like the idea of the authorities being able to demand your papers please as you are walking down the street – you don’t have to carry ID about your normal business. That is A Good Thing in my view. Obviously if you start breaking into a shop with a crowbar you will get arrested, but it’s kinda nice to actually have to be committing a crime before you get your collar felt 😉 But I suspect this will disappear in the coming years, in the same way as the simplicity of how  I opened two of those bank accounts disappeared over the years since the millennium. I simply went into the branch and producing my works staff card and a payslip, rather than the tedious string of paperwork that seems to be needed now.

    There are many forces demanding more traceability and accountability where we used to muddle along fine without it. Terrorism keep getting rolled out as a great reason for ID cards, though I am sure cars kill more people in the UK than terrorism, so a rational approach to reducing early deaths would be to get self-driving cars ASAP. And for God’s sake do stop falling off high places… Don’t get me wrong, I am all for nutting mean-spirited psychos from killing random people because their twisted mentality says so, but canning more common  sources of random death first seems a better win, and surrendering centuries’ old freedoms to reduce the very low chance of getting killed that way seems a bum deal. I have reigned myself to the fact I am likely to see some version of John Walker’s Unicard in the next few decades…

    The end of the tax year is coming up. Don’t leave it to the last minute

    It’s time to use one’s capital gains tax limit and to fill up this year’s ISA, and because of all these pettifogging rules and regulations it pays to do that a good few weeks before the April 5th deadline. Just in case some obstructive oik says you need to provide this or that documentation. I have to say that opening investment accounts has been relatively pain-free for me compared to anything to do with banks or the GOV.UK website, but it still takes time. It was a hell of a job to squeak in opening a SIPP in time to take advantage of an extra year of saving after Osborne’s kind offer of pensions freedom a couple of years ago, and certainly if you need to open an ISA this year then it’s worth having a few weeks in hand to do it. Particularly if you are going to try and Bed and ISA (or -SIPP) unwrapped shares to use your capital gains limit this year. What that means is do it now

    It seems peculiarly tough that you have to be part of the almost universal trend towards spending and living on more than you earn to be considered a participant in the 21st century economy. There are shadows of the societies of the sci-fi I used to read as a teenager where the oddballs became unpersons – Ray Bradbury’s The Pedestrian springs to mind. The System can’t identify people who don’t work and don’t owe any money or claim benefits. They just don’t exist in the models of Britons that are used by the powers that be, with their shadowy and unaccountable data jacks on the citizenry’s digital lifestreams. The signals dribbling through their data taps are too weak compared to the streams of new credit applications and the richness of normal people’s economic lives. I don’t know if it’s a down on the FIRE community in general or I am a particular outlier. But it’s a pain, I don’t now assume any sort of account opening on change is going to happen in less than a month.

    Notes:

    1. personally I don’t touch Premium Bonds, but since any income is tax-free and NS&I doesn’t need FSCS protection it’s a good match for the risk tolerance of an elderly widow
     
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